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New Moon in Capricorn: the stars and the astrologer

PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 1:56 am
by Katerusko
“Astro” means “pertaining to stars or celestial bodies”, and the magic of the stars has inspired us through the ages.

As an astro-loger, how much of the actual sky do you work with?

Do you actively refer to or study the sky, or are you content with your ephemeris?

As the chart is a map, do you think we have lost something by replacing the map with the territory? Or have we developed a worthy enough substitute?

Also, are there any stars that you have a special relationship with? Or any star lore that has had particular significance for you, or for one of your clients?

Re: New Moon in Capricorn: the stars and the astrologer

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 7:29 am
by tobias
Currently, I only know about 10 planets, asteroids and some of the fixed stars.
The 10 planets are most easy to use, asteroids still do not work well for me.
Maybe I am most interested in the meaning of fixed stars. But there seem to
be so many of them.

I would like to observe certain stars with a telescope, however, this is difficult
when you live in a densely populated city and there are too many houses around
which spare you the view. You need to get out of the city and climb a mountain
until you can do that.

Actually, I do not understand what you mean by territory.

Aldebaran seems to be most important for me. Most astonishing for me was,
that I believed that my origin must be Aldebaran even before studying astrology
and getting to know about my birth chart.

Not very familiar yet with star lores.
I just came upon Japanese Haiku recently, mentioning about the stars.

For example: 荒海や佐渡に横たふ天の川
Turbulent the sea, Across to Sado stretches, The Milky Way.

It is said, there are 80000 shrines in Japan, although only a few hundred of them
are said to be associated with belief in the stars. I could find a least one of them.

Re: New Moon in Capricorn: the stars and the astrologer

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2016 4:35 pm
by Katerusko
Boaz Fyler

I love the night sky and my studies with Dr. Bernadette Brady and Dr. Darrelyn Gunzburg transformed my view of it. I now learn about the whole sky not just the ecliptic. The stars, not just the planets and the myth behind their shining lights.

I still use the regular horoscope with most of my clients but look forward to the moment I feel knowledgeable enough to start doing sessions with stars and other constellations. I do have an affinity to the royal stars naturally and to Spica, Alnilam and Alcyon. 

I see this ancient knowledge coming back as a renaissance of information returning on the eve of the Aquarian age. 


Arlan Wise

I look up at the sky whenever I am outside at night. Because I have a dog that's quite often. I can recognize some constellations but not too many. I do make an effort to see conjunctions, like Venus-Jupiter. Looking up at the stars gives me a feeling of wonder.
I rely on my ephemeris to know where the planets are.
The new and full moons are more interesting as I see the nights change. About 15 years ago I used to go into the woods every full moon and walk in the moonlight. After a few minutes I could see everything and have a lovely experience being under moonlight. I still like to be outdoors in that special light.


Adam Gainsburg

This topic is near and dear to me. For 4 years, I've called it our Living Sky. I am the founder of Sky Astrology and the cofounder of the Sky Astrology Conferences with Gary Caton and Julene Louis. I rely on and refer to the sky in all my work - research, client readings, forecasting. I have multiple softwares to render the sky in different views. There is a piece of astrology software that I originated called Sky Engine, which was born of my commitment to a Living Sky in contemporary practice. 

To your questions....  In one sense, we have indeed lost something vital by using the chart only. There is currently an entire generation of practicing astrologers who have little to no experience with origins of our tradition nor how to incorporate some sky considerations into their work. But whatever is lost is not really lost, only forgotten temporarily. The question is how long will it take for a majority of us to re-incorporate the sky into their work.   

To me, the chart is not a substitute for the sky. It's a necessary, required dimension of what it means to practice astrology today. Chart astrology is to thank for the millions of our clients and readers who have been turned on to how they can live better, more fulfilling lives. 

But this chart-only astrology - with the certifying org's fully behind it - are not the only dimension of what's possible and being practiced today. Combining Chart + Sky opens the door to entirely new, wider and deeper astrological genius. This is literally true: a wider and deeper dimension of experience in doing our astrology. As a result, our clients get the benefit of this bigger, more intelligent, more integrated intelligence directly. We astrologers sincerely do not know how good we can become if we do not incorporate some or a lot of the Sky reality into our work. Chart-only astrology is selling ourselves and our clients short. 

I'd like to also respectfully point out that the final part of your survey question refers to fixed star meanings as representative of the "sky" in astrology. This is not so. Fixed stars are used today in much the same way as signs and their attendant myths. The cognitive processes we use to delineate both is the same; we are simply drawing on a different library of information proven throughout hundreds of generations. Delineating using the sky requires much more fluency and intimacy with movement both of space and time. This is because planets and stars, when interpreted from within a sky-centered context, possess multiple cyclic movements all of which are relevant in delineation. A useful way to understand the relationship between the two is to see the sky as the context and the chart as content. This places objects of knowledge on the chart (sign meanings, etc.) within the physical universe's complex of rhythmic cycles and movements (approaching or distancing, descending or ascending, brightening or dimming, and many others).

As those readers can tell, I'm passionate about this topic because I believe it represents THE single, unifying factor amongst all traditions of extant astrology. I've been presenting on the "sky factors" of a planet's position as powerfully teamed with its chart factors of sign, house, aspects, dignity and others at conferences, chapters and online. The joy of experiencing other astrologers' eyes light up upon re-discovering the somatic intelligence of the sky in their own bodies continues to inspire me.

I 'd invite those sincerely interested in discovering the actual, living origins of our field to visit SkyAstrologyConference.com and (soon to come) SkyAstrology.us  ("us" as in We). 


John Schmeeckle

I lived in southern California for 20 years, and for most of that time the stars and planets were drowned out by ever-present light pollution.  However, during my last year there I had a job that brought me out to the countryside in the middle of the night two or three times a week, with a long break to walk along star-lit paths.  Just because the stars were accessible, I began to orient myself.  I used the Big Dipper to locate the North Star (as I had learned a a kid), and started making a point of recognizing geometric patterns among the brighter stars close to Orion (the only classical constellation that I knew) and the North Star.  I avoided studying traditional constellations, because I wanted to make my own associations.  My goal was to work my way to the ecliptic and then learn the zodiac constellations after I had made my own observations.  I realized that this would take several months, as different sections of the ecliptic came into view.   I finally started studying the traditional constellations, just before my job came to an end, and then it was back to the endless light haze of greater Los Angeles. I would sometimes go out at night where I could usually see a few of the brightest stars, but my stargazing class was effectively over

Margaret Logovatovskaya

Working with the fixed stars in the client's natal chart makes a significant addition to the description of the client's life. Especially that thing becomes apparent when many benevolent or evil stars are in the horoscope. This significantly affects both the nature of man and his life processes.
For example, a girl, whose family was not very rich, was able to succeed in her own business, became a successful designer among the well-known and influential people.
There were favorable planetary influences in her horoscope. There are a number of stars, which enhance the favorable prognosis for success. Such stars as the Mirach Star (the star of friendliness, that bestows good fortune to fate), which stands on the Sun (with reference to the girl that is constantly smiling, enjoying life, what pleases a large crowd of fans).
Beta Ursae Minoris Star (the star of good relations), which stands on the cusp of 7th house, the star of a partnerships (in reference to the girl that is surrounded by nice people, supported and helped in the promotion).
The Altair Star (grants success and the rise in Russia) is on the Moon (in reference to the girl that has established herself as a successful designer in Russia).
The Aldabaran Star (the star of enterprising people, creating a prominent social position) is on Mars.
Three personal planets have strong stars, which have a positive effect on the girl's fate. She said she could do her own thing, do not sleep, do not eat, but create and build. And her creations as well as her radiant smile attract people to her, making her a successful businesswoman.
As another example of the stars that intensify the destructive influence of the horoscope. The girl, also from a poor family, life goes unresolved difficulties. She did not receive education, lost her husband (who died of tuberculosis), had bad relationship with her mother, he father's early death, permanent financial difficulties. The planet of disaster - Uranus is located on the south in the 10th house in the MS. The result was quite unpleasant. But then there's the star Antares on Uranus.
This is just terrible combining. Uranus is still retrograde, and throughout life it will converge with the south node, reinforcing the theme of loss and troubles in her life. And the Antares star, as they say, spiced up.
Therefore, the fixed stars can be seen as an essential part to the main dish - a horoscope, which makes the interpretation of the horoscope special piquancy and accuracy.


Anne Ortelee

Back in December of 1995, I had been studying astrology for just over a year. A mythic astrologer named Wendy Ashley came to New York City to give a lecture at the annual NCGR Education Conference.  She offered to take us sky watching ~ we would watch Venus, Mars, and Jupiter set and watch Saturn rise from a Balcony in New York City!  I was stunned.  So I went. 

The next summer, Wendy offered a weekend of skywatching on a houseboat in Maine.  We spend the night on a houseboat in the middle of darkness surrounded by the islands of Maine, tucked into our sleeping bags, and stretched out all over the boat.  As the sky pictures rose in the east, Wendy regaled us all night long with tales of the various constellations and the myths associated with them.  Stars and constellations rising were literally the first "motion" pictures!  At 3:15 am the tide changed, and the houseboat swirled with the tidal movement, shifting direction.  We headed back to shore after sunrise for a delicious breakfast and sleep. 

It was an amazing experience and connected me to the stars as part and parcel of our personal mythology and purpose. I often include the prominent stars in a person's chart during a reading or if progressions are stirring one up. 

In terms of fixed stars I pay attention to Algol comes to mind as a cautionary tale.  When I was first learning the stars, I would ask about them when they appeared in a client's chart. Algol, as the star of beheading held particular interest but I wanted to be "cautious" when asking about him.  So a client arrived with Algol on her Mercury in the 11th house.  Seemed like a safe enough placement for Algol to ask about. Her older brother (both Mercury and his placement in the 11th house of older sibling) had been decapitated in a car (Mercury) accident. Algol on Mercury in the 11th house!  So I became even MORE cautious about the fixed stars. 

There are fixed stars I do "warn" clients about ~ especially the ones that promise a huge fall from grace if you do bad things or if there are a number of dangerous triggers appearing to set one off.  I figure IF I see it, AND they are coming to me, I should let them know about it.  One client had the danger of suffocation star and some harsh transits coming to it. So I advised him to be conscious of places where that could happen.  He was meditating in a cave off the coast of Thailand.  You could only enter the cave at low tide.  He noticed the water wouldn't fill the cave so decided to stay the 12 hours of the tide change and meditate in the darkness.  Then he heard my warning go off in his head, repeatedly.  It actually was a bit of a struggle for him to get out of the cave as the tide was starting to come in so he almost gave up and stayed in the cave.  He pushed on through the water.  When he got to shore, some one said "It is good you left the cave.  There is not enough oxygen in there for the full 12 hours.  You would have died.  We often find people dead in the cave.".  The client thanked me and started to study astrology himself!
   

Khatuna Gviniashvili

Before the term ‘’astrologer’’ comes  in use, there was another word for this profession in my country - ‘’ star-counter’’.  I   must say - I like this word.  I think it expresses the main essence of our profession,  as  in ancient times,  astrologers were indeed watching at the real sky, real stars,   to count them,  and to study their moving.
Of course it will be fine if I study the sky therewith  using modern technologies,  astrological programs, but unfortunately my  superficial knowledge of astronomy  doesn’t allows me to do it. Therefore what  I can do is  to study moon phases on the real sky only.  So,  it will be very interesting for me to listen about  experience of other people .

Mary Lewis

As an astro-loger, how much of the actual sky do you work with?
I don't work with the actual sky alot. I LOOK at the night sky alot, but do not work with it alot in direct reference to astrology.
Do you actively refer to or study the sky, or are you content with your ephemeris?
I "study" the sky in wonder...or take it in, in wonder. It remains mostly wild and uncharted for me. And, I love that.
As the chart is a map, do you think we have lost something by replacing the map with the territory? Or have we developed a worthy enough substitute?
Yes, we have lost something in the same way that we always do when we develop working constructs. But, we have also added something meaningful,
important and usable that communicates in its own way, that can deeply impact humans.
 
Also, are there any stars that you have a special relationship with? Or any star lore that has had particular significance for you or one of your clients? 
Asetoids/Centaurs: Hygeia, Chiron and Pholus.

Alice Kashuba

My window faces due east. I love watching the Moon rise and Sun rise. Over the year I watch the Sun move across my window from north to south and south again. Staying current with Venus, Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn and their placements and aspects encourages me to go outside and stand with arms outstretched to absorb the energies. I encourage clients and others to at least pay attention to the Moon and the movement of the Sun and the appearance of Venus. The sky and all the stars connect us with the vastness of the universe and its unknown inhabitants, energies, and mystery.  The sky is alive and in motion along with the earth. Charts and ephemerides and computers are valuable tools but without the living sky they become dry and mechanistic. Only the sky reflects the beauty and mystery of the stars.


Sue Minahan

Stars captivated my attention for my entire life stirring questions of how to realize light travel and eternity. Identifying the Big Dipper with the Little Dipper to find the North Star gave a sense of destiny to the night sky because North seemed a common constant we could use on Earth.  Knowing the North Star gave a purpose to the night sky and linked human's primal past. Recognizing Orion added some familiarity to the night panorama, but without serving any tangible evidence I understood to use.   Orion was like a landmark I knew ancient cultures saw, and I felt some value of truth that Orion still appeared as a portrait, like a beautiful vista on the land. 
 
Fortunately, during the last few years I've learned to watch for the planets lining up in the sky.  Seeing the planets aligned in the sky shows why they are all in the same sign and in conjunct relationships.   It changes theory into practice.  The planets are talking rather than just planted on paper.

Only in the last few years I've learned about fixed stars, and found it illuminating to learn they have astrological signs and degrees.  My Moon is 22 Libra and South Node is 24 Libra.  I have Spica right there are 23 Libra, and informed the Hawaiian ancient sailors used Spica strongly in their navigation.  I wonder if that's possibly a reason why the North star always appealed so greatly to me -- though I imagine it appeals to most everyone. I also have my natal Saturn at 0 Virgo.  Regulas at 29 Leo has progressed to 0 Virgo.  I feel great respect for it, and am more in awe of it than knowing how to associate it in my life -- but, then, it's in my 12th house, and Saturn has its timing I am increasingly aware.  So my education is just starting when it comes to the fixed stars.

However, these two star points serve to root the sky closer, and that's what I've always yearned.  So, I'm glad for these questions to further integrate and interpret, because I the more I am aware of what stars exist in what sign and degree, and how to recognize their constellations, the closer and more intimate astrology speaks.


Maurice Fernandez

We have to remember that astrology is only partially referring to astronomy and the actual sky…constellations have different sizes than the signs, and the precession of the equinoxes put the Tropical zodiac in a different framework.
However, I do find that studying the sky is essential, or at least complementary, to astrology. The visible planets tell a visual story that cannot always be depicted in the computer chart – just looking at the changing size of the Moon gives us an important impression of the cyclic nature of life.
 
I find it lacking and sad that many astrologers have no experience of astronomy, and I hope this will change as we continue to improve our study program. This is why OPA will have Astronomy presentations at the next OPA Retreat in Utah next October.
 

Kay Taylor

I report, somewhat sheepishly, that I have no connection to the stars in terms of astrology. I am happy with the ephemeris or the computer chart, allowing my knowledge of the meanings and my intuitive read to generate symbolism based wisdom. However, if I watch a Star Wars type film (or as I went through the Star Wars ride at Disneyland many years ago with my children, again and again, until they begged me to stop so we could go to other rides), I am filled with tears of love and gratitude for the cosmos and my sense of connection with the stars. This is very heart felt and occurs when I see many stars and galaxies together, or have the feeling of moving through space back to my home star system, and is not strongly connected with individual planets and stars.

Dmitriy Paramonov

I like looking at the stars. I like watching the sky. The house I live is very well located, so in summer I can go out on the balcony and watch the sky. I bought an atlas of the sky, and independently produced a sextant and a small telescope. I like to make tools with my own hands. I love to watch the stars and planets, but while reading a horoscope I do not use stars. I use stars while analyzing horary horoscope. 
I am satisfied with the information that I get from the computer. My astrological program builds a map that I need. I see no reason to change anything.
 

Jennie Chen

The question is quite hard, here is my answer:

As an astro-loger, how much of the actual sky do you work with? none.
Do you actively refer to or study the sky, or are you content with your ephemeris? At this point, I am only able to check with ephemeris.
As the chart is a map, do you think we have lost something by replacing the map with the territory? Or have we developed a worthy enough substitute?
It certainly help to know more about the sky and the stars, but I do think a chart/map is worthy enough substitute. 
Also, are there any stars that you have a special relationship with? Or any star lore that has had particular significance for you or one of your clients?   None at this point.


Kate Rusko 

Although I am by no means an expert, I love the night sky. I started sky watching last winter by getting up early and putting my coat on top of my pjs and walking around outside. There was a lot of morning time action at that time. I felt blessed!

I would now prefer to look at an image of the current sky map rather than look at the current horoscope. It simply speaks to me more. And I think “simple” is the key: there is something so direct about our reaction to the night sky: its stories are already a part of us as, in the words of Bernadette Brady puts it, we were the ones to put them there!

I am currently incorporating the stars into my readings. I had a profound experience the first time I looked at a regular client’s birth time skymap: I had no idea how much was hidden behind the horoscope. I am a visual person, and I respond to what I can see.
The chart is an amazing tool, but it has created another separation from the world we actually live in. For that reason alone, I would encourage everyone to go out and have an “oh my god” experience with the sky. No one will ever gasp with wonder looking at a horoscope- sorry.

I love seeing Rigel, and anything in Orion. He’s such an imposing figure. I also love Alphard, the heart of the Serpent Hydra, another really amazing constellation.


Tobias

Currently, I only know about 10 planets, asteroids and some of the fixed stars.
The 10 planets are most easy to use, asteroids still do not work well for me.
Maybe I am most interested in the meaning of fixed stars. But there seem to
be so many of them.

I would like to observe certain stars with a telescope, however, this is difficult
when you live in a densely populated city and there are too many houses around
which spare you the view. You need to get out of the city and climb a mountain
until you can do that.

Actually, I do not understand what you mean by territory.

Aldebaran seems to be most important for me. Most astonishing for me was,
that I believed that my origin must be Aldebaran even before studying astrology
and getting to know about my birth chart.

Not very familiar yet with star lores.
I just came upon Japanese Haiku recently, mentioning about the stars.

For example: 荒海や佐渡に横たふ天の川
Turbulent the sea, Across to Sado stretches, The Milky Way.

It is said, there are 80000 shrines in Japan, although only a few hundred of them
are said to be associated with belief in the stars. I could find a least one of them.